Shaun Oliver died a hero, trying to save a stranger’s children from drowning at Wollongong’s City Beach

Wollongong drowning: Shaun died a hero, trying to save a stranger’s child HERO: Shaun Oliver. Picture: Facebook
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Picture: Robert Peet

TweetFacebookWollongong drowning: Shaun died a hero, trying to save a stranger’s childhttps://nnimgt-a.akamaihd苏州夜生活/transform/v1/crop/frm/bEHa392pg8uWfDH5RxA6T9/d172152c-c830-4d68-bfca-f1b6bbb7f2b4.jpg/r2_85_958_625_w1200_h678_fmax.jpgA father-of-three who drowned at a Wollongong beach on Sunday has been hailed a hero.man, drowned, died, oliver, four kids2017-09-12T05:30:00+10:00https://players.brightcove苏州夜生活/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5571631676001https://players.brightcove苏州夜生活/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5571631676001An off-duty paramedicleft his wife and his own young child on the sand in order to bring the 10-year-old boy ashore, saidDetective Inspector Brad Ainsworth, of Wollongong Local Area Command.

Mr Oliver got into trouble as he attempted to rescue the 12-year-old boy.

Surfers ultimately came to the boy’s aid. Meantime, Mr Oliver was swept out to sea.

Three police officers later stripped off their uniforms and pulled him to shore, where paramedics tried in vain to revive him.

Paramedics transported one patient, believed to be in a serious condition, to Wollongong hospital by road ambulance.

He was later pronounced dead at Wollongong Hospital.

“It’s a heroic act,” Det Insp Ainsworth said. “It’s unfortunately cost him his life.”

The stricken children and their father were visiting the unpatrolled beach from their home south of Wollongong.

Read more:Most people can’t spot a rip. Can you?

Addressing reporters on Monday morning, Det Insp Ainsworth expressed frustration at the loss of life. He described surf conditions at the time as“treacherous” and confirmed the beach was closed when the family entered the water.

“There was a heavy surf, there was a drag, there was an undercurrent -there were all the conditions there that you don’t go in,” he said.

“It’s a tragic loss of life and, not putting too much of a point on it … it really puts individuals that come to the aid of people there in danger, and it’s the ultimate sacrifice, I suppose.”

“We haven’t even reached the swimming season yet. Unfortunately it’s a timely reminder and warning that you swim between the flags, at patrolled beaches only.”

[email protected] Illawarra duty officer Daren Weidner speaks following this afternoon’s rescue at Wollongong City beach https://t苏州夜生活/q4Na0Y9qOApic.twitter苏州夜网/FMUksh2oz2

— Andrew Pearson (@andrewrpearson) September 10, 2017

Mr Oliver leaves behind a wife and three young children.

He was employed as project manager at a company in Lynbrook, in south-east Melbourne, and was a shopfitter by trade.

​In a Facebook comment, his sister Clare Murray wrote “we are all shattered”.

“My brother… the ultimate hero. We cannot believe this has happened… a loss that will be felt by many,” she wrote.

Mr Oliver’s brother Nathanael has launched a Gofundme campaignaimed at supporting the 32-year-old’s grieving family.

”He was faced with the terrible decision when he heard the cries for help and, without a thought for his own safety, launched himself into the water,” Nathanael Oliver wrote.

His aunt and uncle, Gary and Karen Oliver, said they were“so very proud, and so very sad” at their nephew’s actions.

He attended Chandler High School in Keysborough, graduating in 2002.

School friend Joel Tranquille said: “Hewas a great friend to everyone, you wouldn’t be able to find a single person that would tell you otherwise.”

“It’s never easy when you hear about a friend passing when he is still so young, especially a great bloke like Shaun,” Mr Tranquille said.

Another high school friend, Lisa Pountney, saidMr Oliver “would talk to everyone even socially awkward people”.

“(He)would make you laugh or smile if you were sad, he would always put others before himself, he was a bright and loveable guy,” she said.

His former sporting club, Keysborough Football Netball Club,tweeted: “Devastating news that our former junior and senior player Shaun Oliver drowned trying to save two young children in Woolongong (sic)”.

The emergency unfolded about 4.30pm on Sunday, almost two weeks before patrols at the beach will get underway as part of the 2017/2018 patrol season.

The off-duty paramedic and two children were transported to Wollongong Hospital for assessment, but did no require admission.

Lachlan Pritchard, Surf Life Saving state duty officer, said authorities had issued a hazardous surf warning on Friday, and that conditions had eased by Sunday but were still considered dangerous.

“It can be quite deceiving, the surf conditions,” he said.

“While the waves might not look too big, the undercurrent …is quite strong and that’s what does cause most of the issues. The conditions can sweep you right out.

“If you do get stuck in a rip, we encourage you to raise your hand to signal for help and ride the rip out to the back where there is calmer water and hopefully wait for emergency services to arrive.”

Surf lifesavers are urging swimmers to heed the “no flags, no swim” message, as summer approaches.

Illawarra Mercury with The Age

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Best in the nation: Sydney Uni comes in fourth in world rankings

The University of Sydney has been ranked fourth in the world for graduate employability, coming in ahead of leading institutions such as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge University and the University of Oxford for its effectiveness in “preparing students for the workplace”.
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The University of Melbourne is closely behind with a rank of seven in the latest QS Graduate Employability Rankings, followed by the University of NSW at 36, the University of Queensland at 49 and the University of Technology Sydney at 69.

A total of eight n universities have been listed in the top 100 in the ranking, which was launched in 2015 to look beyond traditional measures such as research strength and academic reputation. Instead, it focuses on students’ chances of finding jobs soon after graduation, institutions’ reputation among global companies and connections with employers, and the achievements of alumni.

It currently ranks the top 500 universities in the world.

Overall, Stanford University was ranked first for graduate employability, followed by the University of California, Los Angeles, Harvard University, the University of Sydney, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Cambridge, the University of Melbourne and the University of Oxford.

Martin Juno, lead analyst in the QS intelligence unit, said that Sydney University was the only institution “to achieve at least a top 40 rank in all five metrics considered”.

It was ranked eighth in the world for employer-student connections, 14th for its partnerships with employers and in the top 20 for its graduate employment rate.

“All this makes [Sydney University] one of the most reputed institutions among employers in the world … [it] is clearly [doing] an excellent job in terms of employability, with their employer engagement strategy being top of the class,” Mr Juno said.

He said it was the most successful university in “at producing graduates with highly successful career paths”.

Mr Juno also highlighted the University of Melbourne and UNSW as the two most reputed n institutions among employers.

“Leading institutions present a remarkable aptitude and willingness to successfully engage with a wide range of employers, providing students and [graduates] with an extensive network and, thus, work-placement opportunities,” Mr Juno said.

“This enhanced collaboration with companies and organisations, both domestically and internationally, is usually translated into a higher employer reputation, more successful alumni and a higher employment rate after graduation.”

A number of n universities have performed far better in the graduate employability ranking than the overall QS World University Rankings, which were released in June. The University of Sydney was ranked at 50 in the overall ranking while the University of Melbourne came in at 41.

Mr Juno said that this was mainly due to weaknesses in measures that are excluded from the graduate employability rankings, including research strength and student-to-faculty ratio.

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Town ‘going nuts’, so locals are escaping to these tiny places

An attention grabbing budget priced property at Newstead sold easily as it was priced at $235,000 and was on 970sq metres and close to the local school. This church conversion at Fryerstown fetched $675,000 when it sold recently.
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In Harcourt, an elegant four bedroom home on an acre is looking for $598,000.

Originally a Victorian home built at Maryborough, the lovely, four bedroom Rosehill farm has been moved several times before landing in Maldon. It’s on the market for $675,000-$695,000

Just as the domino effect of property jostling happens in the capital cities, so it can play out similarly in some of the top sea and tree change townships.

Castlemaine – the artsy hub of the Goldfields region that has been known as “Northcote North” since being colonised by early tree changers and first-home buyers who realised they had to get out of Melbourne to get into the market – continues to maintain such allure that “it’s going nuts!” according to agent Tom Robertson.

The Waller Realty agent says “the amount of enquiry is phenomenal. We’re flat out sales-wise, too. There are no quiet seasons here anymore”.

Fellow agent Brett Waller, of Castlemaine Property Group, laments that “for this time in spring, the amount of stock is well down”.

Most inquirers are coming from Melbourne. “But we’ve also got people moving up from Woodend now because they no longer feel like they’re in the country until they get past Malmsbury.”

With the continuous waves of incoming newbies, even on a cold day, Castlemaine township is rocking.

Photographer Michael Rayner, who moved up last year because in search of affordable property and “a powerful sense of community” embedded within a scene he could relate to, has counted 14 cafes in the commercial hub.

READ MORE:

Related: Why Melburnians flock to KynetonRelated: Stawell, a town that won’t quitRelated: What’s the future for Wallan?

“It’s funkster junction,” confirms Robertson.

Yet, in a town where any cute period property in need of renovation is now hard to find, and when they are fixed up can sell for $600,000 to $700,000 – “with quite a few selling for $1 million” – the domino effect is in operation.

The response of some long-term residents who liked it sleepier, has been to move out of the big smoke they believe Castlemaine has become and on to the smaller, cheaper, satellite villages of the district. Here, they can buy a nice house for about $400,000 and either pocket the change or put it into their super.

“They’re escaping,” says Robertson. “Escaping the Melbourne-type prices and moving one town further out.”

This “Castlemaine effect” is bringing into focus the old gold rush towns of Maldon, Harcourt, Fryerstown and Guildford.

History-redolent Maldon, with its film-set red bricks, rusting galvanised iron and streetscapes of arching verandahs is, Waller says, 20 minutes from the transport links of Castlemaine.

“People now settling in Maldon are prepared to travel to Castlemaine to commute to Melbourne (90 minutes by train to Southern Cross Station),” he says.

If their children don’t attend schools in Maldon or Castlemaine, including a Steiner School option, the kids also become commuters, travelling on to reputable colleges in Kyneton, Bendigo or Maryborough.

On granite country and famous for its wines and apples, Harcourt hasn’t much of a commercial centre. But in all the residential breathing space, there are some tidy and affordable homes.

One that is more upmarket than most is a four-bedroom home in Reservoir Road that, on an acre, is looking for $598,000 through Wallers.

“Harcourt is popular because it’s handy to Melbourne, interesting to young families,” says Robertson, “and there’s quite a bit of subdivision talk going on.”

In pretty and scantily populated Fryerstown, 10 kilometres south-west of Castlemaine, Robertson has just sold another top priced “but beautiful church conversion for $675,000”.

At the other end of the price scale and consequently contested by a crowd of interested buyers is an interesting new house built using old materials that Brett Waller has also just sold for $235,000. (Yes, you read that right!) Sited at Newstead, a town midway between Castlemaine and Daylesford.

Also on the way to Daylesford is picturesque, if low-key, Guildford (population 333) where, among a handful of properties on the market, are an almost million dollar, four-bedroom brick house on 20 acres, and a converted train “with a pool and three bedrooms”, adds Robertson.

Speaking of trains, Brett Waller reckons that because Castlemaine and its satellite settlements are now considered viable for daily city commutes, the velocity of the region’s future development will hinge “on what happens next in public transport”.

That, and the domino effect of property jostling.

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OpinionDear Jeff, don’t call us precious

NO PITSTOP: “This is not a ‘one off’, but will happen every year for at least five years”. The work being done on the foreshore for the Supercars event. Photo: Max Mason-HubersDear Jeff Corbett,
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Newcastle East residents are being no more ‘precious’than residents anywhere in the world would be having a motor racing track built outside their front doors (‘Precious in the East End’, Herald 9/9)

We believe motor racing should be on a purpose-built, permanent track and not in anyone’s backyard. InNovember,V8s will race at more than 250kmhthrough the 40kmhstreets of Newcastle East, less than 5 metres from the front doors of 120-year-old terraces and businesses.

Imagine this event taking place though the Rocks precinctin Sydney. Imagine concrete barricades being set up for 20 per cent of the yearin front of cafes and restaurants overlooking Sydney Harbour.“Utter madness,” Sydneysiders would say. They know what’sgood for theirlocal economy.

In Newcastle, however, we seem quite happy with the idea of barricades obscuring the amenity of our prime beachside cafesand popular tourist attractions for up to threemonths every year. We are actually prepared to spend ratepayers’ money to help out Supercars.

More than 113 small business line this circuit. The loss of their amenity for up to three months every year will be considerable. They will suffer from traffic congestion and parking problems and will be unable to operate as usual, both during the event and in the construction period before and after the event. Already many businesses in the East End are reporting 60 per centlosses.

This is not a “one off”,but will happen every year for at least five years. There is no compensation for any of their financial losses.

A bit disruptive you say?Newcastle’s design-winning Foreshore Park has been rendered unrecognisable. Almost 200 trees have been cut down.A road has been built through the heritage listed Coal River Precinct. Another 2 hectares of the Foreshore Park is being concretedto house the two-storey pit stop facilities and concrete laid for grandstands.The rustic, narrow road below Fort Scratchley has been widened into a race track, totally transforming its heritage character and appeal.

Both Nobbys Road and Newcastle’s oldest road, Watt Street, has been dug up in order to remove the water inspection vents from the road to the footpath, to accommodate the race track. Newcastle City Councilhas fundedthis work, despite it being specialised infrastructure only necessary for a motor racing circuit. There’s no doubt council’s budget for this work has blown out.

In the public interest you say? The only financial figures available to test this assumption are thosemade public by Supercars. These have beenshown to be highly exaggerated by auditor-generals in Victoria, Canberra, Sydney, Queensland and Hamilton, New Zealand. The auditor-general in Canberra was scathing in his assessment of the idea that the Supercarsevent ‘showcased’ that city to the world. Canberra city council paid Supercars out -three years into their five-year contract -because of the money they were losing.

Jeff,I urge you to check out the history of Supercars events.Don’t simply rely on their promotional material. Why did it lose so much money in Canberra and Homebush? Why did the Gosford administrator reject the Supercars proposal three weeks before our council enthusiastically endorsed it?

There might be agood story here for a journalist such as yourself to investigate.

Dr Christine Everingham is aconcerned resident of Newcastle’s historic East End

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William Tyrrell: September 12, 2017, marks three years since his disappearance

William Tyrrell. Photo: SuppliedSEPTEMBER 12 will forever mark the day William Tyrrell went missing, and three years on there is still no sign of the little boy.
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Shortly before 10.30am on Friday, September 12 2014, William, then aged three, was playing in the yard of his grandmother’s home on Benaroon Drive, Kendall, when he disappeared.

Hundreds of local residents and emergency service workers combined to search the rural township, looking in forests, creeks and paddocks for the boy in a search that spanned nine full days.

As a result, police formed the view that William’s disappearance was as a result of human intervention and detectives and analysts from the State Crime Command’s Homicide Squad established Strike Force Rosann to investigate William’s disappearance.

The Camden Haven State Emergency Service unit controller, and now the Port Macquarie-Hastings local government area local controller Paul Berg, was a part of the initial crew who searched for the first nine days.

He said the experience is one he thinks about almost every day.

“I never thought it would be something this big. When we first got there it was as simple as a child gone missing from a house,” he said.

“It’s important to note that on a job like that, we are a support role for police.

“You do think about it. It’s always on your mind, but so are a lot of jobs that you go to.

A family photo of William Tyrrell, circa 2014.

“I still find myself thinking about it, particularly with the media attention. Coming up to the three year investigation, you kind of can’t get away from it.”

Mr Berg said each event is very different and it affects people in different ways.

“Anything that involves a child is harder to deal with, and that’s the father side of me talking,” he said.

“You think of it a bit like that, and it depends on the circumstances around it.

“The SES has a range of support facilities for our members, and close friends and families always support us. We all support each other (in the emergency services).”

William Tyrrell: missing for three years.

The $1 million rewardOn the second anniversary of the disappearance of William, the NSW Government announced a $1 million reward for information on his whereabouts – the largest reward offered in NSW history.

The lead investigator in the disappearance of William Tyrrell, Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin said at the time that it was very important to dispel the perception that the announcement indicated police had run out of lines of inquiry.

“This is a very proactive investigation, we’ve got numerous lines of inquiry, and we see the reward as another tool to find out what’s happened to William,” Det Ch Insp Jubelin said.

The investigation was the largest in the state with 2,800 reports to Crime Stoppers, a further 196 reports of information direct to the taskforce and 1,078 possible sightings reported at the time of the reward being announced.

The community is still rallying for William with a walk held in Port Macquarie on September 10, 2017, raising awareness and encouraging people to never forget.

Three years on with Detective Chief Inspector Gary JubelinWilliam would be six years old this year, 2017, and to mark the anniversary of William’s disappearance, Det Ch Insp Jubelin outlined some of the ongoing work and the current status of the investigation.

He said Strike Force Rosann investigators remain highly motivated to provide answers to William’s family.

“Our team is mindful of the unresolved grief William’s family is feeling at the moment, and as investigators we are seeking to provide answers above all else,” he said.

“The last 12 months hasn’t been any easier than previous years – we are frustrated that after three years we are not where we want to be – but we are still determined to find out what happened to young William.”

Det Ch Insp Gary JubelinFrom the familyThe foster parents of William released a statement ahead of the third anniversary of his disappearance.

“Where are you William? Where are you our precious little boy? Tomorrow will mark the third anniversary of your abduction and three tragic years of unspeakable heartbreak and endless tears,” the statement said.

“Tomorrow will mark three years without you, three years of not knowing where you are, three years of keeping hope in our hearts that with every new tomorrow will come the day that you’ll be found.

“William, we will never stop loving you. We will never stop looking for you, and until the tomorrow we yearn for comes, we will never give up hope that you will be found and returned home to the arms of your loved ones where you belong.”

From September 11, 2017, the Where’s William Campaign will be rolling out a digital ad campaign featuring the $1 million reward on billboards, in shopping centres and on screens in cafes and offices around .

Police are urging anyone with information about the disappearance of William Tyrrell to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or use the Crime Stoppers online reporting page.

William’s family

Port Macquarie News

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Even Judi Dench has jumped on the fidget spinner trend

Judi Dench, and Ali Fazal pose during a photo call for the film Victoria And Abdul at the 74th Venice Film Festival in Venice, Italy. Photo: Domenico StinellisJust as the fidget spinner seemed to be fizzling out, Dame Judi Dench has jumped on the trend.
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While at the Toronto International Film Festival to promote her latest film Victoria and Abdul, in which she plays Queen Victoria, Dench was questioned byUSA Todayabout her hobbies. The 82-year-old actor attempted to steer the conversation towards her desire to constantly expand her vocabulary by learning a new work each day, but was soon interrupted by co-star Ali Fazal who outed Dench as an avid fidget spinner fan.

“She owns a fidget spinner. Judi Dench owns a fidget spinner! It’s the coolest damn thing,” Fazal said.

Though hesitant at first, Dench proved to USA Today’s Andrea Mandell that she’s still keeping up with contemporaries by pulling out her tiny spinner from her eye-glass case and taking it for a spin on camera.

Dench’s press tour for the movie continues to prove that you really are only as young as you let yourself feel.

Just last week Dench’s admissions on still liking intimacy and sex were met with a barrage of headlines around the world. The actor also displayed her discontent about being probed about her retirement plans by BBCBroadcaster John Humphrys for the Radio 4, Best of Today Podcast.

“When are you going to retire?” Humphrys asked, before swiftly adding, “Let me rephrase it, are you???I knew that would be the reaction.”

Dench clapped back saying, “How dare you! What is that word? What is that word retire? Well hopefully not, I don’t know.”

After Humphrys questioned if retirement was ever on the cards, Dench explained, “I hope to do another film before the end of the year and I hope to do another one next year too.”

“And I just hope you know, hope that I’m going to be employed. I just always hope I’m going to be employed.”

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To privatise or not to privatise

In a perfect world, this article would have begun with a quote from the gangster/shrink movie Analyse This, released in 1999. In the event, though, the movie’s rating — due in large part to the ‘salty’ dialogue — leaves little that can be included here without censoring so much of it that it more closely represents morse code.
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It stars, you might recall, Billy Crystal as a psychiatrist and Robert De Niro as a mob boss. De Niro, as Paul Vitti, reluctantly asks Crystal’s Dr. Sobel for help. Of course, being Hollywood, all’s well that ends well — and it’s a very funny journey.

Both men are there because they expect to be able to work together — and to both benefit from the process??? notwithstanding some aggression and disagreement along the way. Which, if you’ll excuse the metaphor, is often the relationship between government and investors when it comes to privatisations.

Most people will have a view on privatisations. But, without being unkind, most of those views are couched in an ideological world view. Government either should or shouldn’t own particular types of business, for those people.

Which, I’d submit, is a problem.

But that’s not to say each camp doesn’t have a point. The econocrats and competition-focused types — the Paul Vittis, if you will — believe, with some justification, that the private sector can run businesses much more successfully (read: profitably and with greater efficiency) than government. That’s hard to argue, given falling staff numbers and rising profits in organisations that were previously in government hands.

Those who focus primarily on the social good — let’s evoke the good Dr Sobel — will often argue that government has an important role in the provision of many different services. They would suggest the profit motive in otherwise-privately-owned businesses means that we all pay higher prices for the products and services we use.

Of course, life is not that simple??? or that black and white.

And there are a heap of hits and misses complicating the story. Privatising Commonwealth Bank hasn’t exactly helped the bank meet its regulatory requirements. Or improve competition in the banking sector. But Qantas — and its relatively poor post-float bottom line performance — has probably saved the government from a heap of (potentially costly) issues.

Telstra shareholders are either happy with their lot — if they bought the first tranche and remember to include their dividends — or unhappy if they bought T2 at the height of the dot苏州夜总会招聘 frenzy. But the taxpayer has missed out on the profits made in the meantime??? assuming the company would have made those profits in public hands, without job cuts. Meanwhile unions decry those losses, many consumers complain about services.

From a purely economic perspective, of course, there’s no reason — other than lack of political will — that those organisational changes, including job cuts, couldn’t have been made while the organisations were in public hands. And the buyers — either stock market investors or private equity companies — are only going to buy if they’re getting a good deal. The mythical win-win

In investing, win-win outcomes are very rare — it’s like selling your house. If you get a great price, the buyer overpaid. If she got a bargain, you lose out. So if these floats are — to use the investment banking euphemism –‘successful’ because the share price rises after the listing that’s money that the government left on the table.

Think about Sydney Airport, the nation’s power stations, our state TABs and the ‘poles and wires’ deal in NSW. Add in Medibank Private and QR National (now Aurizon).

Where there were willing buyers, those buyers either got a bargain, or were sold a pup. No-one takes the deal unless they are expecting to make money from it — cash that could have otherwise accrued to government coffers.

I have a deal of sympathy for those arguing for privatisation — most services have improved, capital investments have been made, and in at least a few cases, the risk of ownership belongs in private hands. Would Telstra, as Telecom, have invested sufficiently in mobile spectrum and new technology? Would Qantas have been a millstone around the government’s neck? CBA, despite its troubles, may not have become a market-leading player in technology implementation and discount stockbroking.

And those people — often including me — have a simple, and very reasonable, solution. Ownership is one way to exercise control, but governments have an equally powerful set of tools at their disposal: regulation.

We’ve seen the NBN negotiations where the federal government essentially repossessed the cables, ducts and pits from Telstra. The government controls banking policy on capital requirements and ownership concentration. It can decide how airports, railways and power stations are to be run.

Where the rubber hits the road, though, is governments’ awareness of the need — and willingness — to regulate effectively. Will a government really regulate to hurt a private owner of formerly government-owned assets? And with the budget balance foremost in mind, governments could easily be incentivised to pass regulations that would boost the value of the assets they’re planning to sell.

It’s also tempting to wonder what decisions might have been made differently if government still owned some of those assets, particularly in energy. Would there be as many coal-fired power plants? Would distributed energy (where locally produced and stored energy replaces or augments the main ‘poles and wires’) be further along if there was no government incentive to lease the distribution assets? Foolish takeaway

In a perfect world, ownership by government is a redundant requirement where that same government sets the rules for how a privatised asset is used or a privatised business is run. If you believe — correctly — that the government will do the right thing, the risk probably belongs in private hands, where service provision can be assured.

The real question is whether such regulation is, can and will be enacted to protect the public interest. If a mob boss and a psychiatrist can part as friends, maybe it’s possible??? Or maybe that’s just Hollywood.

[email protected]苏州夜总会招聘

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Scott Phillips is the Motley Fool’s director of research. You can follow Scott on Twitter @TMFScottP. The Motley Fool’s purpose is to educate, amuse and enrich investors. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691).

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New meningococcal combo vaccine approved for infants

A new combination meningococcal vaccine that protects against four strains of the potentially life-threatening disease can now be given to babies as young as two months old.
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The vaccine MENVEO offers immunity for the meningococcal strains A, C, W and Y.

It was approved by the Therapeutics Goods Administration for use in infants from two months old in July.

Its manufacturer GSK had to initially prioritise at risk groups and adolescents but has now increased its stocks to supply pharmacies and GP surgeries with additional doses for infants.

Currently the national immunisation program offers a free vaccine against meningococcal C for 12 month olds.

The new combination vaccine is not subsidised and the cost of the vaccine is likely to vary depending on individual pharmacies and location.

While meningococcal disease was rare, under one-year-olds were at greatest risk and vaccination should be encouraged, infectious diseases expert at Sydney University Professor Robert Booy said.

Under five-year-olds were also at increased risk, with as many as one in 10 children who contract the infection dying of the disease, and roughly one in five could be left with long-term disabilities including brain damage, deafness and limb loss.

“Notifications of meningococcal disease usually peaks in late winter and early spring, so today’s announcement is timely and gives parents a TGA-approved combination ACWY vaccine option to help protect their babies from this potentially devastating condition.”

Overall incidence of invasive meningococcal disease in has decreased since the C vaccine was added to the immunisation schedule.

The number of meningococcal Y and W cases has risen in the past three years by at least 50 per cent, Professor Booy said.

“Protection against multiple strains is important, as the most common strains can change over time,” added Professor Booy.

Meningococcal B is currently the most dominant strain among babies in .

Health authorities have also found the cases of meningococcal W were on the rise, with the NSW government introducing a free vaccine against the strain to all year 11 and 12 students.

The bacterium that causes Meningococcal can infect the blood and membranes around the spinal cord and brain.

Symptoms among infants can include fever, refusing to feed, irritability, tiredness, floppiness, and nausea or vomiting.

If the disease can be fatal if not diagnosed within 24 hours.

The new combination vaccine can also be used in adolescents and adults.

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Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg vs Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon over Liddell

Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg has an argument with Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon on energy issues as they cross paths at Parliament House. Photo: Alex EllinghausenThe tense stand-off between the Turnbull government and energy giant AGL has deepened after different accounts emerged of what happened in a meeting about the future of the Liddell coal-fired power plant.
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Tensions boiled over on Tuesday when Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg and Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon came face-to-face in the corridors of parliament house.

Frydenberg vs Fitzgibbon- robust discussions on energy issues first thing this morning pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/87ckmU2DNi

— Alex Ellinghausen (@ellinghausen) September 11, 2017It’s hard to win a debate Josh when your heart is not in your cause #auspolpic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/jzVAFhWPRP

— Joel Fitzgibbon (@fitzhunter) September 11, 2017

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Mr Frydenberg said the government had secured a commitment from AGL to develop within 90 days a proposal to keep the NSW plant open, sell it, or guarantee equivalent power should the scheduled 2022 closure proceed. The government wants to plant to remain operating to meet a looming shortfall in baseload power.

However, a statement released by AGL following Monday’s meeting noted it had committed to deliver a plan to avoid an energy shortfall “once the Liddell coal-fired power station retires in 2022”.

Andy Vesey CEO of AGL arrives at Parliament House for a meeting with the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in Canberra on Monday 11 September 2017. Fedpol. Photo: Andrew Meares

While Mr Vesey said he agreed to the government’s request to examine keeping the plant running or selling it, the statement emphasised the ageing facility’s growing reliability problems.

Critically, AGL noted any new energy capacity would likely come from the development of gas power, pumped hydro, batteries and better managing electricity demand.

Mr Vesey later told the ABC the company could find a solution for the government while forging ahead with the power station’s closure.

“I think that we are committed to finding the best solution for the market. We believe we can deliver that without having to consider the extension or sell the plant and that’s what we’re going to work on,” Mr Vesey said.

Mr Frydenberg had emphasised that “AGL will take to its board a proposal to keep Liddell open for another five years, or to sell to another party”.

As an alternative, Mr Frydenberg said, the company would also come up with a plan to ensure the equivalent supply of reliable, cheap energy.

On Tuesday morning, the government stood by its interpretation.

When the ABC read out loud Mr Vesey’s quote on his preference to close the power station, Mr Frydenberg said: “Well, he’s also said in his press release that he will follow up the discussion with the Prime Minister in taking a request to keep its Liddell power station running for another five years or to sell it to another party.”

Mr Frydenberg said he would be “astounded, indeed astonished, if [Mr Vesey] was not to do that as promised”.

Outspoken Liberal MP Craig Kelly, the chair of the backbench energy and environment committee, accused AGL of speaking with a “forked tongue” after Mr Vesey suggested the company did not want to see Liddell maintained beyond 2022.

“This seems to be completely contrary to the information that was coming out of the meeting with the Prime Minister and I think it appears AGL speaks with forked tongue,” he said.

Mr Kelly labelled the company “probably one our biggest corporate villains” and accused them of hypocrisy for “rallying against coal at a time when 80 per cent of their generation comes from coal”.

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OpinionHealth omitted from review of EIS: Doctors

There are numerous examples of where communities have been put at risk from the rapid expansion of the coal and unconventional gas industry in NSW. Bulga, Singleton, Camden are some of thesites that come to mind.
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These communities have been exposed to stress from noise and, air and water pollution. Yet despite these harms, the health of the population has been an after thought in the planning process for many years.

Health is the big omission in the current review ofEnvironmental Impact Statements (EIS)by the NSW Department of Planning and Environment, whichhas ignored the issue previously.

The people of NSW, and particularly the Hunter, are frustrated by the EIS process. On numerous occasions significant community concerns have been ignored. This was seen only recently with the approval of a seven-year extension to the Wilpinjong mine afterthere were 600 objections (about 100 approving)from the community. There also continue to be applications for mines such as the Rocky Hill coalmine that is within a kilometre of houses.

Is there going to be a continued disregard for the health of the population?

Robust evidence showsthat mines put local communities at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, respiratory illnesses such as asthma, high blood pressure, kidney disease and strokes.But while the primary objective of an EIS is to protect the environment in order to protect community wellbeing, health is never mentioned in the current review.

Doctors are deeply concerned about this omissionand call for a Health Impact Statement to be done for all major projects.

Too often the government acts as proponent of a project instead of arbiter, and health assessment suffers. To ameliorate this appalling situation, a Health Impact Statement must be done by independent experts who have no pecuniary interests in the project. The process must be carried out by a firm that does not derive its income from this type of consultancy, and independent monitoring of the environmental conditions with results made available to the community.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the ideal agency to undertake this critical task.

However, as outlined in the Environment Justice (EJA)report into the toxicity of coal-fired power stations, the EPA needs to be strengthened to protect human health. Ideally, we need a federal EPA independent of state politics and industry influence.

Furthermore, each new development needs to have an adequate cost-benefit assessment that includes the costly health externalities of a given project on the local population as well as the costs of emissions enhancing climate change. TheBusiness Council of has been calling for a cost-benefit analysisfor many years.

The EIS review document highlights the importance of transparency, however, it is not clear how a project will get its final approval. This needs to be articulated.The community is frustrated by the approval process and is often dismayed when a project that is obviously detrimental to local people is given a green light.

The NSW Government is wasting its time with the review of Environmental Impact Statements – unless all these conditions are met.Only then can the people of NSW have faith that the government has the community’s health front and centre.

DrJohn Van Der Kallen is a Newcastle physician and a member ofDoctors for the Environment

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Stand-off between government and AGL deepens over conflicting statements

Andy Vesey CEO of AGL arrives at Parliament House for a meeting with the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in Canberra on Monday 11 September 2017. Fedpol. Photo: Andrew Meares The tense stand-off between the Turnbull government and energy giant AGL has deepened after different accounts emerged of what happened in a meeting about the future of the Liddell coal-fired power plant.
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Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg said the government had secured a commitment from AGL to develop within 90 days a proposal to keep the NSW plant open, sell it, or guarantee equivalent power should the scheduled 2022 closure proceed. The government wants to plant to remain operating to meet a looming shortfall in baseload power.

However, a statement released by AGL following Monday’s meeting noted it had committed to deliver a plan to avoid an energy shortfall “once the Liddell coal-fired power station retires in 2022”.

While Mr Vesey said he agreed to the government’s request to examine keeping the plant running or selling it, the statement emphasised the ageing facility’s growing reliability problems.

Critically, AGL noted any new energy capacity would likely come from the development of gas power, pumped hydro, batteries and better managing electricity demand.

Mr Vesey later told the ABC the company could find a solution for the government while forging ahead with the power station’s closure.

“I think that we are committed to finding the best solution for the market. We believe we can deliver that without having to consider the extension or sell the plant and that’s what we’re going to work on,” Mr Vesey said.

Mr Frydenberg had emphasised that “AGL will take to its board a proposal to keep Liddell open for another five years, or to sell to another party”.

As an alternative, Mr Frydenberg said, the company would also come up with a plan to ensure the equivalent supply of reliable, cheap energy.

On Tuesday morning, the government stood by its interpretation.

When the ABC read out loud Mr Vesey’s quote on his preference to close the power station, Mr Frydenberg said: “Well, he’s also said in his press release that he will follow up the discussion with the Prime Minister in taking a request to keep its Liddell power station running for another five years or to sell it to another party.”

Mr Frydenberg said he would be “astounded, indeed astonished, if [Mr Vesey] was not to do that as promised”.

Outspoken Liberal MP Craig Kelly, the chair of the backbench energy and environment committee, accused AGL of speaking with a “forked tongue” after Mr Vesey suggested the company did not want to see Liddell maintained beyond 2022.

“This seems to be completely contrary to the information that was coming out of the meeting with the Prime Minister and I think it appears AGL speaks with forked tongue,” he said.

Mr Kelly labelled the company “probably one our biggest corporate villains” and accused them of hypocrisy for “rallying against coal at a time when 80 per cent of their generation comes from coal”.

– with James Massola

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Lili Crane realises dream of releasing her own music

PROMISING: Merewether teenager Lili Crane has released her debut EP All The Sweet Things after travelling to Nashville in May. Picture: Max Mason-HubersTHE realisation that she’s released her own music has only just dawned on Merewether teenager Lili Crane.
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“When I woke up this morning I typed my name into iTunes and it came up and I thought it was so cool,” Crane said.“Like I never thought this could happen.It feels like it’s just the start and there’s more to come.”

The three-track EP All The Sweet Things, released on Monday, is indeed an impressive debut, dominated by the 16-year-old’s powerful vocal. The EP was recorded in May in Nashville during Crane’s week-long trip, funded by her victory last year at theRural Aid ‘s Rising Star competition.

The title track and What You Did To Me were written by Crane, while the opener High Speed was a collaboration with two-time Grammy-nominated producer Shane Adams.

Lili Crane – High SpeedWhile in Nashville the year 10 St Pius X student made the most of her opportunity by working with producers and songwriters Brett Blanden and Greg Hudik and she also performed during an open mic night atSoulshine Pizza Factory.

HEART ON FIREEAT Your Heart Out have been keeping some impressive company lately.

On Wednesday night the Newcastle alternative five-piece completed a two-show support run for English band DeafHavana at Sydney’s Oxford Art Factory.

Deaf Havana were in supporting UK goth rock legends Placebo, and played at the Newcastle Entertainment Centre on Tuesday.

Eat Your Heart Out have been picking up momentum since they won theTriple J Unearthed slot for Groovin The Moo at Maitlandand released their second EP Carried Awayin April.

SUN BLOCKED OUTWE hope you’ve boughtyour tickets for Festival Of The Sun because the Port Macquarie party is sold out. It took 11 days for the three-day festival’s ticket allocation to be exhausted.

RAPID GROWTHIF you’re bummed about missing out on Festival Of The Sun, then Grow Your Own on December 22 might be theperfectalternative.

Following the success of last year’s event, Grow Your Own is moving fromClub Forster to the much-larger Peter Barclays Sports Field in Tuncurry. The expansion has been matched with a superior line-up.

Blue Mountains indie bandCloud Control headline the one-day festival alongsideSkegss, The Belligerents, The Babe Rainbow, Newcastle’sThe Gooch Palms, Ruby Fields, Alex the Astronaut, LosScallywaggs, The Ruiins,The Little Quirks,I OhYouDJs and Pina Coladascope.

Grow Your Own is curated by Forster’sHolly Rankin, better known as Triple J darling Jack River, and fellow Great Lakes localLee McConnell.

MATHISKE’S AWAREWHEN you’re renown as one of ’s finest classical guitarists you generally make some fairly red-hot muso friends. That’s definitely the case for Newcastle’s Bruce Mathiske.

Two weeks ago Mathiske released his new album Soundawareness, named after his charity project which providesmusic for peoplewho have sufferedbrain injuries likestrokes to aidin their recovery.

The project also raises money to provide children from underprivileged backgrounds withaccess to instruments.

Soundawareness features an A-list of collaborators inJohn Paul Young (vocals),James Morrison (trumpet),Andy Firth (clarinet) and Newcastle’sSally Walker (flute).

Mathiske will launch Soundawarenessat Lizotte’s on October 28, where he will be joined by several of the guests from the album.

DINING OUTFREQUENT visitor Sarah McLeod is returning to Newcastle’s 48 Watt Street on October 12, but this time armed with new tunes.

Sarah McLeod – Wild HeartsThe Superjesus frontwoman releasedRocky’s Diner,her first solo album in 12 years, in Augustand this week unveiled her new video for the singleWild Hearts.

The record was written duringa three-month period McLeod spent living in a New York apartment.

McLeod will be joined by Baby Animals drummer and long-time collaborator Mick Skelton onhernational tour.

BUSY BOARKANSAS-raised n bluesman Bo Jenkins will be gettingwell-acquaintedwith the Hunter in the coming weeks.

As part of his east cost tour the left-handed guitar maestro will perform at Maitland’sGrand Junction Hotel on Saturday, before stopping atCooks Hill’sOrient Hotel on Sunday.

If you miss those gigs, don’t fret, you can also catch Jenkins at theClare Castle Hotel inRaymond Terrace (September 22), Gloucester’sRoundabout Inn (September 23), East Gresford’sHotel Beatty (September 24) and finally at Karuah RSL on September29.

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QBE chief John Neal to leave insurer after ‘challenging’ period

QBE Group’s chief executive John Neal is stepping down after leading the insurance giant through a “challenging” five-year period, in the face of investor frustration over the company’s performance.
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Mr Neal will be replaced by the head of its n and New Zealand business Pat Regan, an appointment that was welcomed by investors, amid bets Mr Regan would take the axe to costs and rationalise the sprawling business.

The outgoing chief will step down at the end of this year, having led QBE during a period in which the company has failed to ditch its reputation for springing negative surprises on the market, despite efforts by Mr Neal to simplify QBE.

QBE has in recent months been under renewed pressure from the market after unveiling more surprises including a poor performance in its emerging markets business, and disappointing market guidance at its results last month.

These shocks dealt a blow to investor confidence in Mr Neal’s turnaround of QBE, which had been expanded by a wave of acquisitions under former chief executive Frank O’Halloran, who led the company for 14 years until 2012.

Arnhem Investment Management managing partner Mark Nathan said there had been a build-up in investor disappointment towards QBE in recent years, and the negative surprises of recent months had added to this.

“It’s been quite a difficult period in insurance markets generally during John’s tenure, and there’s been a range of QBE-specific issues as well,” Mr Nathan said. “I think there’s a cumulative effect.”

Mr Nathan said it was too early to asses the legacy of Mr Neal, though history may judge him “less harshly” as the impact of his attempts to simplify QBE and cut costs became clearer.

Senior analyst at Clime Asset Management, David Walker, said many investors had already lost patience with QBE before the downgrade triggered by its emerging markets business in June.

“For many investors, this downgrade was not the last straw – the one before that was,” he said.

QBE shares rose 2.5 per cent on Tuesday to $10.50, but during Mr Neal’s tenure the stock has fallen more than 20 per cent.

Mr Walker said QBE’s share price reflected the market’s disappointment with QBE, and he stressed the June downgrade in its emerging markets business was the result of “mistakes”, as opposed to natural disasters beyond the insurer’s control.

“These are not due to hurricanes or catastrophes. These reflect internal mistakes – own goals by QBE. The emerging markets downgrade was the result of that and that only.”

QBE chairman Marty Becker on Tuesday said Mr Neal had led QBE through a “significant transformation and a challenging period in the insurance industry globally”, as he thanked the outgoing CEO and talked up the performance of Mr Regan’s businesses.

Mr Neal said in a statement: “It has been an honour to lead the organisation for the last five years and I am pleased with the work that has been done to transform QBE into a truly global franchise with an enviable position as a top 20 global insurance and reinsurance company.”

Mr Neal’s departure comes despite him saying in April this year that his contract required 12 months notice and he did not intend to leave the insurer. This occurred after his bonus was cut by $550,000 for failing to disclose to the board he was having a relationship with his assistant.

Bell Potter analyst TS Lim backed the change in CEO, saying he expected QBE would be “rationalised” under Mr Regan to focus on the higher returning businesses.

“We believe this is a good outcome with an experienced and well-regarded industry practitioner assuming the CEO role next year and to guide the insurer ahead in a world of increasing competition and complexity,” Mr Lim wrote.

Mr Regan said in a statement: “QBE has some clear strengths and great franchises, as well as talented and dedicated people and I am delighted to be appointed to lead the group.”

Mr Regan will be a paid a base salary of $2 million, in line with Mr Neal’s base pay, with the potential to earn a bonus of up to $7 million in shares and cash for “outperformance”.

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